Slash stroke and heart attack risk up to 70 percent in less than an hour a week

A lot of people have weird ideas about weightlifting.

They think it’s only for gym rats in muscle tanks with bulging biceps, that it’s hard on your joints or that it causes high blood pressure and decreases flexibility.

But if you look past these common misconceptions and try weightlifting for yourself, you’ll experience some major benefits.

In fact, a new study from Iowa State University shows that even one hour of weightlifting per week lowers stroke and heart attack risk in a big way.

Weightlifting works wonders for your heart

Researchers from Iowa State University just took a closer look at the connection between weightlifting (also known as resistance training) and cardiovascular disease. Here’s what they found…

An hour or less of resistance training per week lowers stroke and heart attack risk by 40 to 70 percent. And that risk reduction happens with or without cardio workouts.

So, even if you’re spending too much time on the couch binge-watching Lifetime movies, lifting weights a few minutes per day can keep your heart in shape. No other forms of exercise necessary.

And there’s more news…

Lifting weights for more than one hour per week doesn’t lower the risk of stroke and heart attack any more. So, don’t feel guilty if you do the bare minimum.

How to work weightlifting into your week

It’s easy to add aerobic exercise to your daily life. You can walk to the grocery store, bike to work, take the stairs instead of the elevator… but weightlifting is different.

If you’re a beginner, you probably don’t have weight machines or dumbbells at home. So, how do you start weightlifting?

Well, the most obvious solution is to join a gym. They’ll have all the weight machines and dumbbells you could ever want. And most likely, someone there who can help you learn how to use the equipment.

But if gym membership isn’t for you, or if you want to experience the benefits of weight training without spending any cash, you could always do bodyweight exercises.

That’s right! Lifting your own bodyweight counts as weightlifting.

Here are some bodyweight exercises you can try to get your resistance training on the cheap:

• Push-ups

• Lunges

• Planks

• Squats

• Pull-ups

• Chair-dips

And remember, all you need to commit to is one hour per week.

Not much to ask considering it’ll slash stroke and heart attack risk 40 to 70 percent.

Still, if weightlifting isn’t for you, for whatever reason, get what exercise you can and use the power of nutrition to guard your heart health, starting with:

Vitamin K2 — A very specific form of vitamin K2, known as MK7, makes sure that the calcium in your body gets shuttled to your bones (where it belongs) instead of getting deposited in the walls of your blood vessels. This keeps them soft and pliable which allows you to maintain normal blood pressure.

Nitrosigine® — A combination of L-arginine and arginine silicate boosts your body’s production of nitric oxide to relax your blood vessels, strengthen and boost the flexibility of your artery walls and support the health of your blood vessel lining.

NSK-SD® Nattokinase — Clotting is a good thing when you’re injured. It stops the bleeding and can save your life. But if your body can’t dissolve the clots once the danger has passed, your blood begins to thicken and your circulation slows. That’s where nattokinase comes in. It dissolves the fibrin found in clots in your vessels, allowing your blood to flow smoothly.

CoQ10 — This amazing “spark plug” molecule creates life and energy in each of our cells. More than 300 studies have demonstrated the cardiovascular health benefits of CoQ10, including its ability to help maintain healthy heart cells, normal blood pressure and memory and reduce free radicals.

Sources:

eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-11/mm-u-pho102918.php

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